Tier et Tout Roulette System – The Complete Guide

tier et tout

    If you fancy complexity you’re likely to love the Tier et Tout strategy. It is easy to learn yet one of the most advanced roulette systems that have ever been invented. It’s very flexible and requires you to make calculations and take notes on a regular basis. Some will find this annoying, while others will appreciate the added level of entertainment that this constant interaction provides. 

    With Tier et Tout being a positive progression system, there is never any risk of suddenly losing substantial amounts as the vast majority of your bets will be placed using previous winnings. This also means that the strategy can yield a good profit in a short amount of time if you’re lucky – at least so if you use it in a slightly modified way.

    The flexibility of the strategy allows it to be used in many different set-ups where the risk versus reward can be adjusted. Not only can you use it on an alternative that pays 1:1, but it also works quite well on betting options that pay 2:1 and even 5:1. If you want to play it safe you can easily do so and if you want to go nuts to test the loyalty of lady luck nothing’s stopping you. 

    Sounds interesting? It is. Continue with us in this thorough guide and we’ll tell you all about the Tier et Tout strategy; how it’s executed, how it can be modified and what its weakness is. 

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    Preparations for using Tier et Tout

    Before thoroughly explaining the execution of the strategy, we urge you to check out these four points that are relevant to Tier et Tout:

    • Make sure you have a calculator at hand
      This strategy constantly requires you to divide your current betting balance into three. To avoid headache we highly suggest using a calculator.
    • You probably want something to write on
      The point of Tier et Tout is to secure a bit of profits from your betting balance at regular intervals. If you want to keep track of these profits you will need something to write on. 
    • Adapt the strategy to your bankroll
      If you’re careless it can be easy to go broke using Tier et Tout as the strategy relies on two losses not happening in a row. This will obviously happen a lot so even though the strategy is considered to be a low-risk one, make sure that you don’t over bet.
    • Use the strategy in a way that makes the most sense to you
      Tier et Tout is incredibly flexible and can be used in a lot of different ways. We will look at many of these in this guide so don’t stare blindly on its original design. Choose a way that works for you.

    How to execute Tier et Tout as it was intended

    In this section we will explain how the Tier et Tout strategy is executed when betting on an alternative that pays 1:1 (red/black, high/low, odd/even). This is how the strategy was created to be used like. We will later go on to look at how it can be modified.

    Like any roulette strategy, Tier et Tout requires you to choose an initial stake to start betting with. This stake will be divided into three so you need to choose a sum that is dividable by this number. It could for instance be 90 pence or £9. To keep things simple, let us say £9.  

    Choose a stake that is dividable by three

    The stake is split into three, which can cover two game rounds at most. You begin by betting 1/3, which in our example would be £3. If you win this round you move on to the next step. If you lose it you bet the remaining 2/3 of your stake on the following game round.

    Bet 1/3 of your stake and if lost bet the remaining 2/3

    Regardless if your first bet is won and you move on to the next step or it’s lost and you win with your second bet, you will end up with the same balance. In our example this balance would be £12. Let’s clarify this just to be sure that you’re with us.

    If you won your first bet of £3 you would get paid a total of £6 and since you already had £6 left from your stake (the 2/3 you didn’t use), the end balance would be £12. If you lost your first bet of £3 and won with your second bet of £6, you would get paid £12. Either way your new balance is £12.

    Whether you win with your first 1/3 or second 2/3 the balance becomes the same

    The next step of the strategy is to divide the new balance by three once again. You would, in other words split £12 into three to get £4 (1/3) and £8 (2/3). This pattern keeps repeating itself until you hit a balance that can’t be divided into three or you lose both of your bets.

    • If you lose both of your bets
      Should this happen it is game over. You would have to start over with a new stake that you divide in three. Either the same as you began with (in our case £9) or a new one. That’s totally up to you.
    • If you hit a balance that can’t be divided into three
      Whenever this happens it’s time to secure some profits. The way the strategy was created you’re supposed to remove the smallest number that you can until you hit an amount that is dividable by three. So if you ended up with a balance of £16, which can’t be divided by three, you remove £1.

    This £1 is now a secured profit which you may want to note down on a piece of paper or a word document if you want to keep track. The remaining £15 is your new balance which is yet again to be divided by three before 1/3 is bet and everything repeats itself.

    Secure a profit whenever your balance can’t be divided by three

    To further understand the strategy, check out the below example of 10 winning game rounds. As each round consists of two potential bets (the 1/3 and 2/3) this could of course be up to 20 game rounds in reality (10 lost and 10 won). 

    Using Tier et Tout with an initial stake of £9
    Round
    Stake
    1/3
    2/3
    Stake after win
    Dividable by three?
    Action
    Total profit secured
    1
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £12
    Yes
    No profits are secured
    -
    2
    £12
    £4
    £8
    £16
    No
    £1 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £1
    3
    £15
    £5
    £10
    £20
    No
    £2 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £3
    4
    £18
    £6
    £12
    £24
    Yes
    No profits are secured
    £3
    5
    £24
    £8
    £16
    £32
    No
    £2 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £5
    6
    £30
    £10
    £20
    £40
    No
    £1 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £6
    7
    £39
    £13
    £26
    £52
    No
    £1 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £7
    8
    £51
    £17
    £34
    £68
    No
    £2 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £9
    9
    £66
    £22
    £44
    £88
    No
    £1 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £10
    10
    £87
    £29
    £58
    £116
    No
    £2 is secured to get a dividable amount
    £12

    The stake in the above table is your betting balance, which should always be divided by three. Naturally this will grow quite quickly if you don’t encounter two losing game rounds in a row. In this example we’ve managed to more than tenfold our stake (from £9 to £116) in a maximum of 20 game rounds.

    As you can see on the vast majority of our rounds, the balance that we got after winning was not dividable by three. Therefore a profit was put aside and secured. On the second round this profit was for instance £1, while we had to make it £2 on round 3 as neither £20 nor £19 was dividable by three.

    In this example the strategy looks absolutely fantastic. We have secured a profit of £12 and on top of that increased our stake to £116. In reality this is not that likely to happen though, so let’s get our feet on the ground and have a quick look at the strategy’s weakness.

    The weakness of Tier et Tout

    The big problem with the Tier et Tout strategy is that it only works well when two losses don’t happen in a row. Whenever a losing game round is followed by another the entire stake is lost and only the secured profits are left. This wouldn’t be a huge concern if the secured profits were actually big, but they rarely are.

    Let’s take another look at the stake and profits from our 10 winning game rounds and what our net profit would be if we actually lost at some point.  

    Using Tier et Tout with an initial stake of £9
    Round
    Stake after win
    Total profits secured after win
    Net profit if next round is lost
    1
    £12
    -
    - £9
    2
    £16
    £1
    - £8
    3
    £20
    £3
    - £6
    4
    £24
    £3
    - £6
    5
    £32
    £5
    - £4
    6
    £40
    £6
    - £3
    7
    £52
    £7
    - £2
    8
    £68
    £9
    +- 0
    9
    £88
    £10
    + £1
    10
    £116
    £12
    + £2

    As you can see, we don’t break even until the 8th win. So with every 8 wins we have to avoid two losing game rounds happening in a row if we don’t want things to go downhill. Is that likely? Not very. On average two losing game rounds will happen as often as 26% or about 1 in 4.

    This means, that in reality the Tier et Tout strategy is likely to make you lose slow but steadily. Even if you make it to round 8 before losing, it would be a £2 loss. It’s not much as the stake is mostly made up of previous winnings and we have £7 secured as profits. But it’s still a loss and it’s not very exciting if this keeps happening all the time.

    The good news is that the system can be easily adapted to prevent this depressing spiral. It won’t make you win any more in the long run as the RTP of roulette can’t be changed, but it will break you free from this slow and steady stream of losing that you’re otherwise likely to experience. 

    Countering the weakness of Tier et Tout

    Turning the slow but steady stream of losses of Tier et Tout into something more exciting is not rocket science. It can easily be done with one of two minor adjustments:

    • Secure more profits than what you’re supposed to do
    • Secure your entire stake as a profit at some point

    Let’s illustrate how this would work by starting off with the first alternative of securing more profits than what the strategy initially tells us to do.  

    Using Tier et Tout with more profits secured
    Round
    Stake
    1/3
    2/3
    Stake after win
    Dividable by three?
    Action
    Total profit secured
    Net profit if next round is lost
    1
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £12
    Yes
    £3 is secured instead of £0
    £3
    - £6
    2
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £12
    Yes
    To raise stake, no profits are secured
    £3
    - £6
    3
    £12
    £4
    £8
    £16
    No
    £4 is secured instead of £1
    £7
    - £2
    4
    £12
    £4
    £8
    £16
    No
    To raise stake, £1 is secured
    £8
    - £1
    5
    £15
    £5
    £10
    £20
    No
    £5 is secured instead of £2
    £13
    + £4
    6
    £15
    £5
    £10
    £20
    No
    To raise stake, £2 is secured
    £15
    + £6
    7
    £18
    £6
    £12
    £24
    Yes
    £6 is secured instead of £0
    £21
    + £12
    8
    £18
    £6
    £12
    £24
    Yes
    To raise stake, no profits are secured
    £21
    + £12
    9
    £24
    £8
    £16
    £32
    No
    £8 is secured instead of £2
    £29
    + £20
    10
    £24
    £8
    £16
    £32
    No
    To raise stake, £2 is secured
    £31
    + £22

    As you can tell by comparing these 10 winning game rounds to the ones we had before, things look very differently. Here we see a much slower progression as on round 10 we’re only at a £32 stake as opposed to £116. The profits we have secured are also way different. Before we had £12 secured on round 10 and now we have £31. So what have we done here?

    Instead of increasing the stake on every winning round, we have secured additional profits so that the stakes are only increased every other round. On the first round we’re not supposed to secure any profits as £12 is dividable by three, but we do it anyway to counter the weakness of the strategy.

    So what have we achieved by doing this? Instead of breaking even after 8th wins like before, we’re now at a profit of £4 as early as after 5 wins. You will not always get to this stage of course, but in the short run you’re much more likely to be making a profit this way. When you’re lucky to get on a spree, things also get way more exciting as your secured profits become much higher.

    Now let’s take a look at the other alternative where the entire stake is secured as a profit at some point.

    Using Tier et Tout with the entire stake secured
    Round
    Stake
    1/3
    2/3
    Stake after win
    Dividable by three?
    Action
    Total profit secured
    1
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £12
    Yes
    No profits are secured
    -
    2
    £12
    £4
    £8
    £16
    No
    £1 is secured to get a divideable amount
    £1
    3
    £15
    £5
    £10
    £20
    No
    £2 i secored to get a divideable amount
    £3
    4
    £18
    £6
    £12
    £24
    Yes
    No profits are secured
    £3
    5
    £24
    £8
    £16
    £32
    No
    £2 i secored to get a divideable amount
    £5
    6
    £30
    £10
    £20
    £40
    No
    Secure the entire stake and start all over again
    £46

    In this example we have chosen to secure all of our profits after round 6, which can make things quite interesting. Round 2 – 5 will cut our losses a bit should we encounter two losing rounds in a row, while the 6th round rewards us with a big cash prize should we manage to get there. Whenever we do, we start all over again with a stake of £9 that we divide in three.

    If you’re looking to win more than this, you can simply change the round that you choose to secure your entire stake as a profit on. The longer you wait the more likely it is for you to encounter two losing game rounds in a row, but the profits will also increase faster and faster. If you made it to round 10, the stake secured as a profit would be £116.

    It should be noted that this modification of the strategy makes it quite similar to the Paroli system. However, instead of doubling our stake after every win (which is done with Paroli) we buy ourselves a second chance by only increasing it by 50%. We also secure some minor profits when our stake can’t be divided by three, which isn’t a feature of Paroli.

    Using Tier et Tout on other bet alternatives

    As we’ve already mentioned and partly looked at, the flexibility of the Tier et Tout strategy allows it to be used in many different ways with slight changes. If you want the stake to be increased more rapidly to potentially generate higher winnings at a faster pace you can do so by betting on an alternative that pays 2:1 or even 5:1. Instead of 1:1 that is.

    The big difference of using the strategy this way is that your balance won’t be the same regardless if you win with you first bet of 1/3 or your second bet of 2/3. The balance will be higher by winning with the second bet. It doesn’t really make much of a practical difference though. The execution of the strategy will still be the same and if you want to apply the modifications that we just looked at above, this works just as well.  

    Please note though that it’s much more difficult for us to showcase the strategy when it’s used on other alternatives than those that pay 1:1. However, to give you a brief overview, have a look at our 2:1 example below.

    Using Tier et Tout on an alternative that pays 2:1
    Round
    Stake
    1/3
    2/3
    Stake after win
    Dividable by three?
    1
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £15 or £18
    Yes and Yes
    2.1
    £15
    £5
    £10
    £25 or £30
    No and Yes
    2.2
    £18
    £6
    £12
    £30 or £36
    Yes and Yes

    As you can see, the first round will either generate a balance of £15 or £18 depending on the bet that wins (1/3 or 2/3). Furthermore, the second round will either generate a balance of £25, £30 or £36. It doesn’t matter what your new balance becomes though as this should still be divided in three for the next round. It does, however, complicate the calculations a bit.

    But if you want to win more and spice things up this can be a good way to do it. After the second round we already have a stake of £25 – £36 in difference to the £16 we would have betting on an alternative that pays 1:1. Things also escalate much more quickly. After round three our stake would be £72 at best and £40 at least as opposed to the £20 of the 1:1 version.

    The advantage of these potential winnings does of course come with the downside of two losses in a row being much more likely to occur. On average this will happen 46% of the time or about 1 in 2. That’s almost twice as often as when betting on an alternative that pays 1:1.

    If you’re greedy or lady luck is smiling upon you, you could also take a shot using the strategy on a line bet that pays 5:1. The two first rounds could then look like this:

    Using Tier et Tout on an alternative that pays 5:1
    Round
    Stake
    1/3
    2/3
    Stake after win
    Dividable by three?
    1
    £9
    £3
    £6
    £24 or £36
    Yes and Yes
    2.1
    £24
    £8
    £16
    £64 or £96
    No and Yes
    2.2
    £36
    £12
    £24
    £96 or £144
    Yes and Yes

    As you can see, the potential winnings are massive and this is only the beginning. Should you get on a spree where two losses in a row don’t happen for a while, you will cash in big and you will do it quickly. At least so if you’re wise enough to secure a good amount of profits or stop at some point.

    However, as good as this may look the odds are against you even going past the first round. Two losses in a row will on average happen as often as 70% of the time or about 2 in 3. This means that you will lose your initial stake a lot. But it wouldn’t be gambling if that wasn’t the case, would it?

    Pros and cons of Tier et Tout

    Pros
    Cons
    + No risk of suddenly losing your bankroll
    - The strategy is quite complex
    + The strategy is incredibly flexible
    - Calculations constantly have to be made
    + Play with a low or high volatility
     

    The Tier et Tout strategy certainly won’t appeal to everyone as it is very demanding. It requires a lot of work – not only with calculations but also figuring out exactly how you should use the strategy to fit your particular play style.

    This complexity is, however, also its strength. The calculations will certainly make a roulette session more eventful and how great isn’t it to have a strategy that can be tailor-made to your needs? If you want to play with a low volatility you can and if you want it to be high to yield potentially enormous profits that works too.

    Regardless of how you choose to use the Tier et Tout system, it’s great in the sense that it will never rob you like a strategy such as Martingale easily could. You never lose more than the stake you initially chose to bet with as you’re only betting winnings during the progression of the system.

    Did you know this about Tier et Tout?

    • The strategy is said to derive from a Spanish casino enthusiast known as Thomas Garcia. He lived in the 19th century and was not your typical law-abiding citizen. His work as a traveling salesman was combined with a past time activity of creating marked playing cards and fake dices.
    • In addition to using these tools to increase his income, he had a passion for roulette and tried a bunch of different systems with the ambition of beating the house. The one we know as Tier et Tout was very successful for him at first. He made more than £300,000 using the strategy at two different occasions at a casino in Germany – an enormous amount for the time being.
    • His luck did, however, eventually turn. He revisited the casino one year later and used the very same strategy. This time he not only lost his entire bankroll, but he also lost money that he borrowed during his visit at the casino. 

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